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LST 40 - 49

LST-40

LST-4o was laid down on 3 June 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp.; launched on 7 August 1943; sponsored by Miss Hilda Sambolt; and commissioned on 15 September 1943.

During World War II, LST-40 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Consolidation of the Solomon Islands:

(a) Consolidation of southern SolomonsJune 1943

Marianas operation:

(a) Capture and occupation of Saipan-June and August 1944

Tinian capture and occupation-July 1944 Okinawa Gunto operation:

(a) Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto - May 1945

Following the war, LST-40 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-February 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 18 February 1946. In February 1947, she was transferred to the United States Military Government, Korea, as a sale, and was struck from the Navy list on 5 March that same year.

LST-40 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST-41

LST-41 was laid down on 24 May 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp.; launched on 17 August 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Mary Spisak; and commissioned on 24 September 1943, Lt. W. B. Dundon, USNR, in command.

During World War II, LST-41 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Marshall Islands operation:

(a) Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls- January and February 1944

Hollandia operation-April 1944 Marianas operation:

(a) Capture and occupation of Guam-July 1944

Western Caroline Islands operation:

(a) Capture and occupation of southern Palau Islands-September and October 1944

Luzon operation:

(a) Lingayen Gulf landing-January 1945

Following the war, LST-41 was redesignated LSTH41 on 15 September 1945. She performed occupation duty in the Far East until late November 1945.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 25 April 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 19 June 1946. On 8 October 1947, she was sold to J. C. Berkwit & Co., of New York City, N.Y.

LSTH-41 earned five battle stars for World War If service as LST-41.

LST-42

LST-42 was laid down on 17 June 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp.; launched on 17 August 1943; sponsored by Mrs. F. M. Leslie; and commissioned on 30 September 1943, Lt. Roy L. Guy in command.

During World War 11, LST-42 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Marshall Islands operation:

(a) Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls- January and February 1944

(b) Occupation of Eniwetok Atoll-February and March 1944

Marianas operation:

(a) Capture and occupation of Saipan-June and July 1944

Tinian capture and occupation-July 1944 Western Caroline Islands operation:

(a) Capture and occupation of southern Palau Islands-September and October 1944

Iwo Jima operation:

(a) Assault and occupation of Iwo JimaFebruary and March 1945

Following the war, LST-42 was redesignated LSTH42 on 15 September 1945. She performed occupation

duty in the Far East and service in China until early April 1946.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 26 July 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 25 September 1946. On 26 March 1948, she was sold to the Kaiser Co., Inc., of Seattle, Wash., and subsequently scrapped.

LSTH-42 earned five battle stars for World War II service as LST-42.

LST-43

LST-43 was laid down on 19 June 1943 at Philadelphia, Pa., by the Dravo Corp.; launched on 28 August 1943; sponsored by Mrs. C. A. Hill; and commissioned on 6 October 1943. She was assigned to the AsiaticPacific theater during World War II and participated in the occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls from 31 January to 8 February 1944. On 21 May 1944, she was lost through an accident. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 18 July 1944. She was raised but deemed beyond economical repair and was subsequently sunk by torpedoes in 1945.

LST-43 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-44

LST-44 was laid down on 7 July 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp.; launched on 11 September 1943; sponsored by Mrs. F. E. Haeberle; and commissioned on 22 October 1943.

During World War 11, LST-44 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the Normandy invasion from 6 to 25 June 1944. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East and service in China until mid-February 1946.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 20 February 1946. In 1947, she was transferred to the United States Army and was destroyed on 23 July 1947, cannibalized and scrapped. On 28 August 1947, her name was struck from the Navy list.

LST-44 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-45

LST-45 was laid down on 27 June 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp.; launched on 31 August 1943; sponsored by Miss Lois C. Donnelly; and commissioned on 15 October 1943.

During World War II, LST-45 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and took part in the following operations:

Marshall Islands operation:

(a) Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls-- January and February 1944

Marianas operation:

(a) Capture and occupation of Saipan-June through August 1944

(b) Tinian capture and occupation-July and August 1944

Okinawa assault-March through June 1945

Following the war, LST-45 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until late October 1945. Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 30 November 1948 and struck from the Navy list on 22 December that same year. On 25 February 1949, she was sold to the Foss Launch & Tug Co., of Seattle, Wash.

LST-45 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST-46

LST-46 was laid down on 20 July 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp.; launched on 16 September

1943; sponsored by Mrs. J. J. Edson, Jr.; and commissioned on 3 November 1943.

During World War 11, she was assigned to the European theater and participated in the Normandy invasion from 6 to 25 June 1944 and the invasion of southern France in August and September 1944. She was later transferred to the Asiatic- Pacific theater where she took part in the Okinawa assault in June 1945. Following the war, LST-46 performed occupation duty in the Far East and service in China until midMay 1946.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 6 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 19 June 1946. On 13 February 1948, she was sold to Bosey, Philippines, and resold to T. Y. Fong on the same date.

LST-46 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST-47

LST-47 was laid down on 30 July 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp.; launched on 24 September 1943; sponsored by by Mrs. Clarence H. Vant; and commissioned on 8 November 1943.

The tank landing ship was initially assigned to the European theater and participated in the Normandy invasion in June 1944 and the invasion of southern France in August and September 1944. She was later transferred to the Asiatic- Pacific theater of operations where she took part in the Okinawa assault between 26 and 30 June 1945. Following the war, LST-47 performed occupation duty in the Far East in the fall and winter of 1945 and early January 1946.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 11 January 1946 and transferred to the United States Army the same day. She was assigned to the Military Sea Transportation Service on 31 March 1952 and redesignated USNS LST-47. USNS LST-47 was transferred to the Philippine Navy on 13 September 1976.

LST-47 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST-48

LST-48 was laid down on 8 August 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp.; launched on 2 October 1942; sponsored by Mrs. A. E. Stacey; and commissioned on 16 November 1943.

The tank landing ship was initially assigned to the European theater and participated in the Normandy invasion between 6 and 25 June 1944 and the invasion of southern France between 15 August and 25 September 1944. She was later transferred to the AsiaticPacific theater of operations where she took part in the Okinawa assault between 30 May and 10 June 1945. Following the war, LST-48 performed occupation duty in the Far East during the winter of 1945 and 1946.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 8 February 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 5 December 1947. On 27 May 1948, she was sold to the Bethlehem Steel Co., of Bethlehem, Pa., and subsequently scrapped.

LST-48 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST-49

LST-49 was laid down on 17 August 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp.; launched on 9 October 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Kathryn Saban; and commissioned on 20 November 1943.

The tank landing ship was initially assigned to the European theater and participated in the Normandy invasion between 6 and 25 June 1944 and the invasion of southern France between 15 August and 25 Sep

tember 1944. She was later transferred to the AsiaticPacific theater of operations where she took part in the Okinawa assault between 8 and 30 June 1945. Following the war, LST-49 performed occupation duty in the Far East and service in China until mid-March 1946.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 11 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 3 July 1946. She was sold to Bosey, Philip i s, on 4 December 1947.

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LST-49 earned three battle stars for World War 11 service.

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