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LST - 350 - 399

LST - 350

LST - 350 was laid down on 10 November 1942 at the Norfolk Navy Yard; launched on 7 February 1943; sponsored by Mrs. C. M. Terry; and commissioned on 13 February 1943. During World War II, LST-350 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings--September 1943 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 LST-350 was redesignated Chandra (ARL-46) on 25 May 1945, but the redesignation was subsequently cancelled. The ship was decommissioned on 26 May 1945 and struck from the Navy list on 12 March 1946. On 2 December 1946, she was sold to the Suwannee Steam Ship Co., Charleston, S.C., and converted for merchant service. LST-350 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 351

LST - 351 was laid down on 9 November 1942 at the Norfolk Navy Yard; launched on 7 February 1943; sponsored by Mrs. P. F. Wakeman; and commissioned on 24 February 1943. During World War 11, LST-351 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Anzio-Nettuno advanced landings - January through March 1944 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 On 12 December 1944, she was transferred to the United Kingdom. The tank landing ship was struck from the Navy list on 15 October 1946 and returned to United States Navy custody on 10 December 1946. She was sold to the Netherlands sometime between 30 December 1946 and 17 June 1947. LST-351 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 352

LST - 352 was laid down on 9 November 1942 at the Norfolk Navy Yard-, launched on 7 February 1943; sponsored by Miss Virginia Henley; and commissioned on 26 February 1943. During World War If, LST-352 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings September 1943 West Coast of Italy operations: (a) Anzio-Nettuno advanced landings-January through March 1944 (b) Elba and Pianosa landings-June 1944 Invasion of southern France August through September 1944 On 24 December 1944, she was transferred to the United Kingdom. The tank landing ship was returned to United States Navy custody on 2 August 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 29 October 1946. She was sold to Greece sometime between 21 November 1946 and 6 January 1947. LST-352 earned four battle stars for World War If service.

LST - 353

LST - 353 was laid down on 15 July 1942 at the Charleston Navy Yard; launched on 12 October 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Estelle Lynette Cushman; and commissioned on 27 November 1942, Lt. L. E. Reynolds, Jr., USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-353 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Consolidation of southern Solomons-June 1943 New Georgia Group operation: (a) New Georgia-Rendova-Vangunu occupation- July 1943 (b) Vella Lavella occupation-August 1943 Occupation and defense of Cape Torokina-November 1943 On 21 May 1944, she was sunk by internal explosion while moored at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, and struck from the Navy list on 18 July 1944. LST-353 earned three battle stars and the Navy Unit Commendation for World War If service.

LST - 354

LST - 354 was laid down on 15 July 1942 at the Charleston Navy Yard; launched on 13 October 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Jean Browne McCall; and commissioned on 27 November 1942, Lt. B. W. Robb, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-354 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: New Georgia Group operation: (a) New Georgia-Rendova-Vangunu occupation- July 1943 (b) Vella Lavella occupation-August 1943 Occupation and defense of Cape Torokina-November 1943 Green Islands landing-February 1944 Capture and occupation of Saipan-June 1944 Assault and occupation of Iwo Jima-February 1945 Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto-April 1945 Following the war, LST-354 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-December 1945. She was decommissioned on 30 April 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 19 June 1946. On 16 December 1947, the tank landing ship was sold the the Southwest Steel Corp., of Pittsburgh, Pa., and subsequently scrapped. LST-354 earned six battle stars and the Navy Unit Commendation for World War 11 service.

LST - 355

Ships Data Section
Public Information Division
Office of Public Relations
Navy Department

HISTORY OF USS LST-355

To meet the complex needs of amphibious warfare, including the delivery of mechanized equipment and personnel directly to the beachhead, some 79,000 specialized landing craft of all types were mass-produced on both coasts and by many inland yards. Workhorse of the landing craft flotillas, the versatile LST (Landing Ship, Tank) is a barge-shaped ship of shallow draft, self-propelled by Diesel motors. Loaded topside with smaller craft, their tunnel-like holds packed with tanks, vehicles, guns, or cargo, the LSTs were a vital weapon in the battle of logistics.

The LST-355, along with its sister ship the LST-356, was commissioned as a vessel of the U. S. Fleet in formal ceremonies held at the U. S. Navy Yard, Charleston, South Carolina, on 22 December 1942. A representative of the Commandant, SIXTH Naval District, read the directive authorizing the commissioning of the ship and Lieutenant Norman L. Knipe, Jr., D-V(S), USNR, assumed command as her First Commanding Officer.

The month of January 1943 was spent in outfitting the ship for sea, and on 3 February 1943 the ship sailed for Little Creek, Virginia, where she underwent training in the Chesapeake Bay. The ship proceeded to New York; there on 28 February 1943 she joined the second group of LSTs destined for overseas duty in the Mediterranean Theatre of Operations. On March 1943 she proceeded in convoy from New York for North Africa. The convoy touched at Bermuda for four days before proceeding to North Africa, arriving off Oran, Algeria, on 13 April 1943. The ship was further ordered to Arzew where she docked the same day.

At this time fighting was still in progress up the coast toward Tunisia, and Arzew and other ports in the vicinity were subjected to periodic air raids. This was the ship's first combat experience and the first time her guns had actually fired at the enemy. During the last week of April 1943, Captain Knipe volunteered to use the ship in a beaching operation near Arzew. The ship broached on rocks and was severely damaged. She was towed back to Arzew where she lay dock-side during May, June, and July 1943. During this time she was cannibalized a great deal by repair forces who used mechanical parts from the 355 for repairs on LSTs operating around Tunis and Sicily. The damage she received during the beaching operation near Arzew prevented the ship from participating in the Invasion of Sicily.

On 31 July 1943 LST-355 was towed to Oran, Algeria, where she was placed in the huge French floating dry-dock which had been repaired and put in operation by the Americans. When repairs were completed the ship proceeded to Bizerte, Tunisia, arriving on 3 September 1943 to prepare for combat operations. Lieutenant A. J. Cadaret, USN, was commanding officer of the ship at this time; succeeding Lieutenant Knipe officially while the ship was under repairs at Oran. On 6 September 1943 she sailed as a part of the invasion convoy for Salerno Bay. On the night prior to clearing Bizerte, a large force of German bombers set off an ammunition dump and a gasoline dump near the harbor.
Severe enemy air attacks were encountered while underway for Italy and several vessels were hit. While under repairs at Oran it had been decided to install various anti-aircraft armament on the main deck of the 355; base forces and repair forces filled the main deck with 40MM, 20MM, and .50 calibre weapons. The installation was originally made to provide ack-ack training for amphibious gunners, but the extra guns came in very handy around Tunisia and Italy.

The ship arrived unscathed in the Bay of Salerno on 9 September 1943, despite a torpedo bomber attack and a daylight aerial attack by German planes using several glider bombs. Soon after daylight on D-Day LST-355, along with 12 other LSTs, was ordered to Red Beach, Safta, "to beach at all costs." Stiff opposition by the Germans had made all our beaches precarious and radio communications to most of the beaches had failed. Shortly after daylight it was observed that the Red Beach was heavily armed with German equipment. LST-355 weighed anchor about 0930 and in company with the other LSTs started in toward the beach from the outer transport area. A destroyer led the column of LSTs toward the beach. While proceeding to the beach German fighters attempted to bomb and strafe the ships. LST-355 was credited with the downing of one enemy plane, which was believed to be an ME109.

As the LSTs arrived within artillery range of the beach, directly North of Agripoli, Italy, German shore batteries and mobile guns promptly opened fire on the LSTs. The destroyer returned the fire but found more targets than she could handle. As a result the USS PHILADELPHIA, a light cruiser, launched her observation planes and moved in to provide additional fire support. Some of the LSTs turned back toward the open sea before reaching the beach, but the LST-355 continued toward the beach under fire with most of the other ships. All the lead ships were proceeding at flank speed and this vessel is believed to have been the first LST to actually beach with the other LSTs hitting the beach in quick succession.

Despite the flank speed, the flat gradient of the beach prevented this ship from discharging its combat engineers with their equipment, and also the ship lost its stern anchor and cable in the attempt. The majority of the other ships discharged their equipment over pontoons brought in by LSTs such as the LST-356 and 338. All the ships were under heavy enemy fire at this time and hits were being scored by German gunners. Another destroyer had been called in to provide fire support, but German armored equipment could be plainly seen on the hills back of the beach. Tanks rolling off LSTs came off firing and tank battles developed right before the eyes of the LST personnel, Seabee Officers, and men who were handling pontoon gear.

It was at this hectic moment that a German Tiger tank came over the brow of a hill directly in front of the ship. The Gunnery Officer of the 355, Lieutenant (jg) L. A. Wilson, USNR, ordered the bow 40MM – a single mount Army-type gun – to open fire on the tank. The gun crew promptly began to pour HE shells into the body of the tank from maximum range and the tank caught fire and was destroyed. Both the Army and the flag aboard the USS BISCASYNE gave the 355 official credit for destroying the enemy tank. This ship is believed to be one of the few LSTs in the fleet having a destroyed tank to its credit.

The ship than managed to retract from the beach and returned to the transport area where it remained until discharging its equipment on LCTs. Concentrated air raids were being made by the enemy day and night; the ship’s antiaircraft weapons were fully manned at all times. Upon unloading, the ship was ordered to Palermo, Sicily, and then to Bizerte. Enemy air attacks continued through this period and several ships were damaged by mines.

The ship was then ordered to prepare for a trip to the United Kingdom, and sailed on 12 November 1943 from Mers-el-Kebir, Algeria, for Gibraltar and the United Kingdom. She was in company with eleven other LSTs, under the flag of Capt. W. D. Wright, USN, who at that time was aboard the LST-356. At Gibraltar the LSTs joined Convoy MKS 30 for the voyage to the United Kingdom. There were about 85 ships in the convoy with the U. S. LSTs being the largest group of American ships in the convoy. Operational control was British and all the escorts were British or Canadian. After several days out of Gibraltar, an enemy search plane was sighted. He continued to follow the convoy during the daylight hours, and was apparently spotting for submarines.

Several submarine attacks were made during the night; as a result of the attacks one British destroyer was sunk. Anti-submarine aircraft from the Azores furnished support during the several surface battles with enemy submarines. On the fifth day out of Gibraltar while approximately 500 miles off the Bay of Biscay, a force of about 27 German HE177s suddenly attacked the convoy with glider bombs and ordinary high explosives. The American LSTs, steaming at the after end of the convoy where the major attack was being launched, engaged the enemy planes with their 3-inch guns and other weapons but scored no definite kills. During the two and one-half hour attack on the convoy, one ship was sunk and three damaged by glider or other type bombs. Four to six enemy planes were destroyed either by ack-ack or friendly patrol planes. During the trip the escorts had been increased from about 13 to 37 to provide additional sub and air protection. No LSTs were hit in the attack but a near miss caused minor casualties on one LST.

No more enemy aircraft were encountered in the remainder of the voyage, but submarines continued to be active, and escorts were kept busy fighting off the attackers.

One Canadian corvette engaged a German sub in a surface gun battle in sight of LST-355 and sank the sub after a short engagement. When the convoy arrived off the tip of Southern Ireland, the LSTs were detached from the convoy and sent - with a Canadian anti-aircraft cruiser and five escorts - directly to the South Coast of England. This convoy (MKS 30) later received much publicity in England and the United States. A detailed story was printed in the Bupers Monthly Bulletin with a chart showing the exact location of the convoy when it was taken under attack by the HE177s. Four enemy submarines were known to have been sunk during the voyage and two believed damaged.

The 355 put in at Falmouth, England, on November 1943 and was promptly given duty training anti-aircraft gunners for the coming invasion of France. During the next six months it remained on the South Coast of England training thousands of amphibious craft gunners. It also participated in Operation Duck around Dartmouth, Devon. Numerous enemy air raids were experienced as the enemy struck at Southern England ports with its Luftwaffe. Enemy planes attacking Plymouth during May 1944 flew in at masthead height over the ship to bomb and strafe the harbor, as well as mine the entrance channel.

The last days of May 1944 was spent loading the ship for the Neptune operation and LST-355 sailed from Falmouth on June 5 1944 with Force "B" for Omaha Beach. It arrived off the beach on D-Day loaded with field artillery, personnel, and equipment (155 MM rifles), but did not discharge until the following day, 7 June 1944. Two boatloads of medical supplies were sent in on 6 June 1994 to Omaha Beach. The ship returned immediately to England and joined the now-famous LST shuttle service across the English Channel. From D-Day to 16 April 1945 when the ship left the United Kingdom for the United States, she had completed 44 trips from England to France. During this time it carried wounded and dead Allied troops and enemy prisoners of war. Two Navy medical officers and one Army doctor, including many enlisted medical aid men, were aboard during the early days of the invasion to give medical attention to casualties.

LST-355 was also part of the railroad shuttle from Southampton Hants, England to Cherbourg, Normandy, France and carried hundreds of U. S. Army railroad cars to France. Special rails were laid in the tank deck for this work and the cars were loaded and discharged over specially built ramps operated by U. S. Army railroad companies. During this shuttle service every conceivable piece of equipment - from bicycles to the heaviest tanks and road grading equipment - was carried successfully across the Channel to France. During the terrific storm that lashed the Allied beachhead several weeks after the initial landing this vessel was underway from the beachhead area to England, and made the trip intact despite the fact that many LSTs were opening seams in their main deck during the trip.

During the Ardennes break-through in December 1944, this vessel was pressed into service as a straight troop carrier for infantry replacements taken directly to France to stop the Nazi Offensive. It continued to operate without the benefit of radar through the worst of the winter in the Channel and is believed to be the last LST in the ETO to receive radar equipment.

On 13 March 1945 Lieutenant Cadaret was relieved of his command by Lieutenant E. L. Rankin, Jr, 149376, USNR(D), at Portland, Dorset, England. The ship was ordered to Falmouth, Cornwall, for availability and there received a radar set. During her availability period orders were received to remove all her deck guns and make the main deck ready to lift an LCT back to the States. This was accomplished in record time and the LCT was lifted at Plymouth, England for its return to the U. S. On 16 April 1945 LST-355 sailed as a part of an LST convoy consisting of 15 LSTs for Norfolk, Virginia, escorted by three American and three English DDs. Heavy fog was encountered soon after leaving Plymouth, so for three days the entire convoy had to depend on their radar equipment and accurate maneuvering to bring them through safely. Several sub contacts were made and the escorts made depth charge attacks. The British DDs left the convoy near Brest and the remains of the convoy proceeded to the Azores and from there to Norfolk, arriving on 5 May 1945.

After five days in Norfolk the ship sailed as part of a Coastal convoy for New Orleans, arriving there on 23 May 1945 and reporting to Commandant, Eighth Naval District, for a 30-day overhaul and conversion into an ordnance installation ship. All hands were granted 30 days leave, with one half of the officers and crew reporting back to Camp Bradford, Virginia, for reassignment; while new officers and men reported to the ship to replace the crew members who had been transferred. Getting underway from New Orleans LST-355 proceeded to the Todd-Johnson Shipyard at Algiers, Louisiana, where she remained across the Mississippi River from New Orleans until 27 July 1945 when it proceeded to Gulfport, Mississippi, to pick up side carry pontoons. While at New Orleans the LST-355, along with LST-308 and LST-392, was given a ten-ton crane on the main deck, a 40MM dual mount, and full equipment for installing 40MM dual mount guns with Mark 51 directors on ships in the forward area. The ship's company was increased to 10 officers and 127 enlisted men. When the ship sailed from New Orleans it carried approximately 15 million dollars worth of ordnance equipment on board.

From Gulfport, Mississippi the LST355 steamed to Galveston, Texas for a brief inspection that resulted in having a new radar antenna installed. On 3 August 1945 the ship sailed from Galveston to Coco Solo, Canal Zone, arriving there on 10 August 1945. Following this date she transited the Panama Canal heading for Pearl Harbor, T. H. On 14 August 1945 word was received of the Japanese surrender.

The ship continued on its original course until it was within five days of Pearl Harbor, when radio orders were received directing her to proceed to San Francisco, California. From San Francisco LST-355 was ordered to Mare Island, Navy Yard, and Vallejo, California for removal of all its ordnance gear. Here she was stripped of all her 40MM dual mount guns including the ten-ton crane and special equipment that had been installed at New Orleans, Navy Yard. The ship's company was reduced to eight officers and 104 enlisted men to serve as a full complement for the LST-355.

On 26 September 1945, 355 sailed for Pearl Harbor, T. H., arriving off Diamond Head on 4 October 1945. Soon after arrival the ship was ordered to Kewlo Basin to load cargo for Japan. Shortly after shoving off for Japan the vessel developed engine trouble and had to be returned to the Navy Yard, Pearl Harbor, for repairs.

By 1 November 1945 USS LST-355 had completed a total of 35,503 miles of steaming since it left Charleston, South Carolina in February 1943.

On 5 November 1945 while at Pearl Harbor, Lieutenant E. L. Rankin, Jr. (D)USNR was relieved of command by Lieutenant John J. Kelley, (D) USNR, who took over as commanding Officer of the LST-355.

Having made an excellent war record with the amphibious force during World War II, the LST-355 was placed out of Commission and disposed of by the War Shipping Administration in March 1946.

Commanding Officers of the LST-355

Lieutenant N. L. Knipe, Jr., USNR
Lieutenant A. J. Cadaret, USN
Lieutenant E. L. Rankin, Jr. USNR
Lieutenant J. J. Kelley, USNR

Stenciled: 10/14/48
Retyped AJC, II 4/26/2001

“UNITES STATES FLEET
HEADQUARTERS OF THE COMMANDER TWELFTH FLEET
FLEET POST OFFICE
NEW YORK

11 March 1946
From: Commander TWELFTH Fleet
To: Lieutenant Albert J., Cadaret, U. S. Navy

Subj: Commendation

1. Your performance of duty as Commanding Officer of the USS LST-355 during the invasion of Normandy, France, 6 June 1944, and during the subsequent build-up period, is deemed worthy of special commendation.

2. As Commanding Officer of the USS LST-355, you handled your ship skillfully in overcoming the hazards of weather and enemy activity during the initial assault on the beaches of Normandy and during the long and arduous task of the build-up which followed the assault phase. Through February 1945 your ship completed forty round trips across the English Channel, landing personnel and material to support the Allied armies. On two occasions your ship was held for long periods on the far shore to act as a towing vessel, and because of your fine seamanship, these operations were eminently satisfactory, despite adverse winter weather in the Channel.

3. I commend you for your splendid devotion to duty and outstanding professional ability in the performance of your duties, which reflect credit upon yourself and the United States Naval service.

4. You are hereby accorded the privilege of wearing the commendation ribbon pursuant to the authority delegated by ALNAV 179-44.

5. A copy of this letter will be forwarded to the Chief of Naval Personnel to be filed in your official record.

 

H. K. HEWITT

Admiral, U. S. Navy”

LST - 356

LST - 356 was laid down on 7 September 1942 at the Charleston Navy Yard; launched on 16 November 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Harold Rivington Parker; and commissioned on 22 December 1942, Lt. G. A. Jaguemot in command. During World War II, LST-356 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Invasion of Normany-June 1944 LST-356 returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 21 September 1945. On 1 July 1955, she was named Bledsoe County (LST-356) after a county in Tennessee. The tank landing ship was struck from the Navy list on 1 September 1960 and sold to the Mechanical Equipment Co., New Orleans, La., on 8 March 1961 and subsequently scrapped. LST-356 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 357

LST - 357 was laid down on 24 October 1942 at the Charleston Navy Yard; launched on 14 December 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Richard Wilder Smith; and commissioned on 8 February 1943, Lt. J. C. Reynolds in command. During World War II, LST-357 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the Sicilian occupation in July 1943 and the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. Following the war, LST-357 performed occupation duty in the Far East in October and November 1945. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 8 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 31 July 1946. On 1 April 1948, the tank landing ship was sold to the Bethlehem Steel Co., Bethlehem, Pa., and subsequently scrapped. LST-357 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 358

LST - 358 was laid down on 24 October 1942 at the Charleston Navy Yard; launched on 15 December 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Robert Arthur Hinners; and commissioned on 8 February 1943. During World War II, LST-358 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Anzio-Nettuno advanced landings - January through March 1944 Invasion of southern France August and September 1944 LST-358 was transferred to the United Kingdom on 24 December 1944. She was returned to United States Navy custody on 27 February 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 15 August 1946. On 3 October 1947, the tank landing ship was sold to the Southern Trading Co., Philadelphia, Pa., and subsequently scrapped. LST-358 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 359

LST - 359 was laid down on 21 November 1942 at the Charleston Navy Yard; launched on 11 January 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Albert Miller Penn; and commissioned on 9 February 1943, Lt. James A. Ferreola in command. During World War II, LST-359 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July and August 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Convoy KMS-31-November 1943 Anzio-Nettuno advanced landings - January through March 1944 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 LST-359 was sunk on 20 December 1944 by a submarine torpedo in the eastern Atlantic. On 8 February 1945, she was struck from the Navy list. LST-359 earned five battle stars and the Navy Unit Commendation for World War II service.

LST - 360

LST - 360 was laid down on 21 November 1942 at the Charleston Navy Yard; launched on 11 January 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Willard James Riddick; and commissioned on 9 February 1943. During World War 11, LST-360 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July and August 1943 Anzio-Nettuno advanced landings - January through March 1944 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 The tank landing ship was transferred to the United Kingdom on 29 November 1944 and returned to United States Navy custody and decommissioned on 10 June 1946. She was struck from the Navy list on 15 August 1946 and sold on 8 October 1947. LST-360 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 361

LST - 361 was laid down on 10 August 1942 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co.; launched on 10 October 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Leverett Saltonstall; and delivered to and commissioned by representatives of the United Kingdom on 16 November 1942. She was returned to United States Navy custody on 7 March 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 5 June 1946. On 11 October 1947, the tank landing ship was sold to Luria Bros. & Co., Inc., of Philadelphia, Pa., for scrapping.

LST - 362

LST - 362 was laid down on 10 August 1942 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co.; launched on 10 October 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Francis E. M. Whiting; and delivered to and commissioned by representatives of the United Kingdom on 23 November 1942. She was torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine on 2 March 1944. LST-362 was struck from the Navy list on 28 April 1945.

LST - 363

LST - 363 was laid down on 2 September 1942 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co.; launched on 26 October 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Kendall Preston; and delivered to and commissioned by representatives of the United Kingdom on 30 November 1942. The tank landing ship was returned to United States Navy custody on 26 January 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 12 April 1946. On 4 December 1947, she was sold to N. Block & Co., Norfolk, Va., for scrapping.

LST - 364

LST - 364 was laid down on 3 September 1942 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co.; launched on 26 October 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Harold B. Buse; and delivered to and commissioned by representatives of the United Kingdom on 7 December 1942. She was sunk due to enemy action in February 1945 and struck from the Navy list on 11 July 1945.

LST - 365

LST - 365 was laid down on 14 October 1942 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co.; launched on 11 November 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Miles Sherman; and delivered to and commissioned by representatives of the United Kingdom on 14 December 1942. She was struck from the Navy list on 15 October 1946 and returned to United States Navy custody on 10 December 1946. On 5 June 1947, the tank landing ship was sold to Fresh Frozen Foods, Ltd., Ayrshire, Scotland, for conversion for merchant service.

LST - 366

LST - 366 was laid down on 1 October 1942 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co.; launched on 11 November 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Kenneth Blood; and delivered to and commissioned by representatives of the United Kingdom on 21 December 1942. She was returned to United States Navy custody on 26 January 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 5 June 1946. The tank landing ship was sold to N. Block & Co., Norfolk, Va., for scrapping.

LST - 367

LST - 367 was laid down on 13 October 1942 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co.; launched on 24 November 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Alfred W. Anthony, Jr.; and delivered to and commissioned by representatives of the United Kingdom on 29 December 1942. She was returned to United States Navy custody on 17 December 1945 and struck from the Navy list on 21 January 1946. On 18 March 1948, the tank landing ship was sold to the Great Atlantic Iron & Steel Corp. for scrapping.

LST - 368

LST - 368 was laid down on 13 October 1942 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co.; launched on 24 November 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Joseph T. Hazen; and delivered to and commissioned by representatives of the United Kingdom on 4 January 1943. She was returned to United States Navy custody on 16 March 1943. During World War 11, LST-368 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the occupation of Saidor in eastern New Guinea in February 1944. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 16 March 1946. The tank landing ship was struck from the Navy list on 17 April 1946 and was destroyed on 16 June 1948. LST-368 earned one battle star for World War 11 service.

LST - 369

LST - 369 was laid down on 13 October 1942 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co.; launched on 24 November 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Claude L. Turner; and commissioned on 8 January 1943. During World War II, LST-369 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations. Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 LST-369 was transferred to the United Kingdom on 29 November 1944 and returned to United States Navy custody on 29 November 1946. She was struck from the Navy list on I August 1947. On 7 October 1947, she was sold to the Tung Hwa Trading Co., Singapore. LST-369 earned three battle stars for World War 11 service.

LST - 370

LST - 370 was laid down on 31 October 1942 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co.; launched on 12 December 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Frederic F. Agens; and commissioned on 13 January 1943. During World War II, LST-370 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 LST-370 returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 7 January 1946. She was struck from the Navy list on 12 April 1946 and sold to Ming-Sung Industrial Co., Ltd., on 3 February 1947 and converted for merchant service. LST-370 earned three battle stars for World War 11 service.

LST - 371

LST - 371 was laid down on 29 October 1942 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co., launched on 12 December 1942; sponsored by Mrs. John E. Varney; and commissioned on 16 January 1943. During World War II, LST-371 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 On 17 November 1944, LST-371 was transferred to the United Kingdom. She was struck from the Navy list on 26 February 1946 and returned to United States Navy custody and decommissioned on 16 March 1946. The tank landing ship was sold to Bosey, Philippines, on 5 December 1947. LST-371 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 372

LST - 372 was laid down on 14 November 1942 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co.; launched on 19 January 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Paul W. Watson; and commissioned on 23 January 1943, Lt. Marvin F. Studebaker, USNR, in command. During World War 11, LST-372 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 Following the war, LST-372 performed occupation duty in the Far East in October and November 1945 and saw service in China in December 1945 through March 1946. Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 9 July 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 15 August that same year. On 3 October 1947, she was sold to the Patapsco Scrap Corp., of Baltimore, Md., and subsquently scrapped. LST-372 earned three battle stars for World War 11 service.

LST - 373

LST - 373 was laid down on 14 November 1942 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co.; launched on 19 January 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Louis P. Davis; and commissioned on 27 January 1943. During World War II, LST-373 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-JuIy 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 She was transferred to the United Kingdom on 9 December 1944. LST-373 was returned to United States Navy custody and decommissioned on 16 March 1946. She was struck from the Navy list on 26 February 1946 and sold to Bosey, Philippines, on 5 November 1947. LST-373 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 374

LST - 374 was laid down on 12 November 1942 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co.; launched on 19 January 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Victor D. Herbster; and commissioned on 29 January 1943 During World War 11, LST-374 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the Sicilian occupation in July and August 1943 and the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 29 May 1945 and struck from the Navy list on 12 March 1946. On 14 January 1947, the tank landing ship was sold to A. G. Schoonmaker. LST-374 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 375

LST - 375 was laid down on 25 November 1942 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co.; launched on 28 January 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Frederick C. Sachse; and commissioned on 2 February 1943. During World War II, LST-375 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 Following the war, LST-375 performed occupation duty in the Far East in January and February 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 18 July 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 10 June 1947. On 31 December 1948, the ship was sold to the Bethlehem Steel Co., Bethlehem, Pa., and subsequently scrapped. LST-375 earned three battle stars for World War 11 service.

LST - 376

LST - 376 was laid down on 25 November 1942 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co.; launched on I February 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Harold C. Pierce; and commissioned on 5 February 1943. During World War 11, LST-376 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 LST-376 was torpedoed and sunk by a German surface craft in the English Channel on 9 June 1944 and struck from the Navy list on 28 June 1944. LST-376 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 377

LST - 377 was laid down on 28 November 1942 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co.; launched on 1 February 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Edward T. Dobbyn; and commissioned on 8 February 1943, Lt. A. C. Parks, USNR, in command. During World War 11, LST-377 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Anzio-Nettuno advanced landings - January through March 1944 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 Following the war, LST-377 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early February 1946. The ship was decommissioned on 7 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 31 July 1946. On 1 April 1948, the tank landing ship was sold to the Bethlehem Steel Co., Bethlehem, Pa., and subsequently scrapped. LST-377 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 378

LST - 378 was laid down on 12 December 1942 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co.; launched on 6 February 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Herbert A. Hope; and commissioned on 10 February 1943. During World War 11, LST-378 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Anzio-Nettuno advanced landings - January through March 1944 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 Following the war, LST-378 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-January 1946. She was decommissioned on 20 February 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 5 March 1947. On 1 June 1947, the tank landing ship was sold to the United States Military Government, Korea. LST-378 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 379

LST - 379 was laid down on 12 December 1942 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co.; launched on 6 February 1943; sponsored by Miss Elizabeth Virginia Collins; and commissioned on 12 February 1943, Lt. John T. Salistean in command. During World War II, LST-379 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landin gs- September 1943 Anzio-Nettuno advanced landings - January through March 1944 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 Following the war, LST-379 performed occupation duty in the Far East in September 1945 Upon her return to the United States, she was decommissioned on 28 February 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 20 March 1946. On 12 April 1948, the tank landing ship was sold to the Bethlehem Steel Co., Bethlehem, Pa., and subsequently scrapped. LST-379 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 380

LST - 380 was laid down on 10 December 1942 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co.; launched on 10 February 1943; sponsored by Mrs. D. J. Callahan; and commissioned on 15 February 1943. During World War II, LST-380 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 LST-380 was transferred to the United Kingdom on 20 November 1944 and returned to United States Navy custody on 11 April 1946. On 7 June 1946, the tank landing ship was sold to the United States Military Government, Korea, and struck from the Navy list on 19 July 1946. LST-380 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 381

LST - 381 was laid down on 10 December 1942 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co.; launched on 10 February 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Everett Goodrich; and commissioned on 15 February 1943. During World War 11, LST-381 was assigned to the European theater of war and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Anzio-Nettuno advanced landings-January and February 1944 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 LST-381 was transferred to the United Kingdom on 19 December 1944. She was decommissioned on 10 June 1946 and returned to United States Navy custody. The ship was struck from the Navy list on 19 July 1946. On 11 September 1947, she was sold and subsequently scrapped. LST-381 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 382

LST - 382 was laid down on 10 December 1942 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co.; launched on 3 February 1943; sponsored by Miss Emily F. Cass; and commissioned on 18 February 1943. During World War II, LST-382 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 LST-381 was transferred to the United Kingdom on 29 November 1944. On 23 January 1948, she was transferred to France on lease and ultimately sold to France for further service on 21 March 1949. The tank landing ship was struck from the Navy list on 28 April 1949. LST-382 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 383

LST - 383 was laid down on 16 June 1942 at the Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.; launched on 28 September 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Estelle Lynette Cushman; and commissioned on 27 October 1942. During World War II, LST-383 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Anzio-Nettuno advanced landings - January through March 1944 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 LST-383 was transferred to the United Kingdom on 20 November 1944. She was retransferred to the Netherlands East Indies Maritime Customs as a sale on 10 June 1946. On 3 July 1946, LST-383 was struck from the Navy list. LST-383 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

 

LST 383 Tribute Site

LST - 384

LST - 384 was laid down on 16 June 1942 at the Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.; launched on 28 September 1942; sponsored by Miss Alice Palen; and commissioned on 2 November 1942. During World War II, LST-384 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: ,Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Anzio-Nettuno advanced landings-January and February 1944 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 Following the war, LST-384 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-December 1945. Upon her return to the United States, she was decommissioned on 22 April 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 5 June 1946. On 8 April 1948, the tank landing ship was sold to Kaiser Co., Inc., Vancouver, Wash., and subsequently scrapped. LST-384 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 385

LST - 985 was laid down on 19 June 1942 at the Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.; launched on 28 September 1942; sponsored by Miss Janet Lee Peebles; and commissioned on 6 November 1942. During World War II, LST-385 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Convoy KMS-31-November 1943 Anzio-Nettuno advanced landings-January and February 1944 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 She was transferred to the United Kingdom on 29 November 1944. The ship was struck from the Navy list on 26 February 1946. She was decommissioned on 16 March 1946 and returned to United States Navy custody. On 5 December 1947, LST-385 was sold to Bosey, Philippines. LST-385 earned five battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 386

LST - 386 was laid down on 9 June 1942 at the Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.; launched on 28 September 1942; sponsored by Miss Mary Randolph Scott; and commissioned on 10 November 1942. During World War II, LST-386 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Tunisian operations-November 1942 through July 1943 Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Anzio-Nettuno advanced landings-February and March 1944 Invasion of Normandy--June 1944 LST-386 was transferred to the United Kingdom on 9 December 1944. She was struck from the Navy list on 15 October 1946. The ship was decommissioned and returned to United States Navy custody on 10 December 1946. On 5 June 1947, she was sold to Frozen Foods, Scotland, and converted for merchant service. LST-386 earned five battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 387

LST - 387 was laid down on 20 June 1942 at the Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.; launched on 28 September 1942; sponsored by Miss Roberta Adele Fitzhugh; and commissioned on 17 November 1942. LST-387 served in the European theater. On 22 June 1943, she was damaged by a German submarine torpedo, between Algiers and Bizerte, and subsequently repaired. The ship was decommissioned on 2 May 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 19 July 1946. On 22 December 1947, she was sold to the Northern Metals Co., Philadelphia, Pa., and scrapped.

LST - 388

LST - 388 was laid clown on 20 June 1942 at the Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.; launched on 28 September 1942; sponsored by Miss Barbara Ann Besse; and commissioned on 20 November 1942. During World War II, LST-388 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Tunisian operations-November 1942 through July 1943 Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 After the war, she was decommissioned on I February 1947 and struck from the Navy list on 25 February 1947. On 7 April 1948, the ship was transferred to the Maritime Administration and later sold. LST-388 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 389

LST - 389 was laid down on 20 June 1942 at the Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.; launched on 28 September 1942; sponsored by Miss Clara Elizabeth Ashe; and commissioned on 24 November 1942, Lt. George C. Carpenter, USNR, in command. During- World War II, LST-389 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 LST-389 was decommissioned on 12 March 1946. She was redesignated Boone County (LST-389) after eight counties in the United States on 1 July 1955 and struck from the Navy list on I June 1959. In May 1960, the ship was transferred to the government of Greece as grant aid where she served in the Royal Hellenic Navy as Lesbos (L-172). LST-389 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 390

LST - 390 was laid down on 20 June 1942 at the Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.; launched on 15 October 1942; sponsored by Miss Robin Holzbach; and commissioned on 28 November 1942, Lt. W. J. C. Baker, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-390 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations : Occupation and defense of Cape Torokina-November and December 1943 Capture and occupation of Saipan-June 1944 Capture and occupation of Iwo Jima-February 1945 Following the war, LST-890 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early March 1946. Upon her return to the United States, she was decommissioned on 12 March 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 29 September 1947. On 3 April 1948, the tank landing ship was sold to Consolidated Builders, Inc., of Seattle, Wash., and subsequently scrapped. LST-390 earned three battle stars and the Navy Unit Commendation for World War II service.

LST - 391

LST - 391 was laid down on 14 July 1942 at the Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.; launched on 28 October 1942; sponsored by Miss Katherine Wendell Blewett; and commissioned on 3 December 1942. During World War II, LST-391 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 In May 1960, LST-391 was transferred to Greece as grant aid where she served in the Royal Hellenic Navy as Rodos (L-157). LST-391 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 392

LST - 392 was laid down on 14 July 1942 at the Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.; launched on 28 October 1942; sponsored by Miss Jane Lewis Irvine; and commissioned on 7 December 1942, Lt. Louis R. Lemaire, Jr., USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-392 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Tunisian operations-May through July 1943 Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings- September 1943 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 Following the war, LST-392 was decommissioned on 12 April 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 19 June 1946. On 8 October 1947, the tank landing ship was sold to the H. H. Buncher Co., Pittsburgh, Pa., and subsequently. scrapped. LST-392 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

-A personal account-

Dear Sirs,
I have read your report on LST 392 and found it not complete. You seemed to leave out its Pacific Tour and assignments which fell by the wayside. Some of your dates mentioned are also different than mine.
USS Lst 392 was built by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company of Virginia. Commission on 7 December 1942.
On 19 March 1943 she was sent to Oran, Algeria. She shuttled between parts of Algerian, Tunisian in support of the Tunisian and landing in Sicily Campains until Sept. 1 compleating 8 voyages to France earning 4 battle stars.
April 16, 1945 she left Falmouth England for the United States where she was converted to an Ordinance Instalation Ship (ARL). On 2 July 1945 she left New Orleans for Pearl Harbor Hawaii. I was a member of her crew for its Pacific assignment. LST 392 made one solo trip to the South Pacific to repair an US Destroyer that was badly damaged in action with the Japanese Navy. We came along side of her moored with her while underway in case of enemy attack and four days and nights working around the clock till all repairs were completed. All of her damaged guns were replaced. They also had a hole in the bow starboard side of the ship that we welded a thick steel plate over it. They were so anxious to get back into the fight hardly giving us any time to paint thier ships number on her bow. We sent them on thier way with a thumbs up sign. That was the end of our tour as an (ARL) we returned to Hawaii to be reconverted back to USS LST 392.
On 11 October 1945 Lt. Blalock was replaced as skipper of LST 392 by Lt. (J.C.) James C Watkins U.S.N..
Carrying a cargo of supplies we were sent to the Christmas, Canton and Faning Islands below the equador. It took us about 29 days to get there from Hawaii.
18 November 1945 Lat. 00000 and Longitude 163' 23' there appeared within our domain the USS LST 392 crossed the equater bound for Christmass, Canton and Faning Islands. Captian was James C. Watkins USN. From there we took abord US Army personel and cargo back to Hawaii. They had enough points to get out of the service by now.
24 Janurary 1946 we left Pear Harbor to sail to San Francisco CA. 25 February 1946we were sent to Galveston, Texas and two days later to New Orleans, LA. We arived 27 March 1946. Here LST 392 was placed out of commission 18 April 1946. Transfered to the Maritime Commission for Disposal.
8 October 1947 the tank landing ship LST 392 was sold to the H.H. Buncher Co. Pittsburg PA. Subsequently scrapped ending a brilliant carrer of having the honor of serving in both campains, European and Pacific Tours. Just want to bring this to your attentio to correct your records.
I was a member of its crew that sailed the pacific and helped to decommission LST 392 in New Orleans, LA 18 April 1946.
Yours Truly,
Anthony J. Smagala Sr. S 1/C
LST 392
18 April 1945 to 18 April 1946

 

USS LST 393
History courtesy of the Great Lakes Navel Memorial & Museum here in Michigan.
Nesteled here in Muskegon "Hertiage Landing". 1346 Bluff, Muskegon, Michigan 49441. Phone 1.231.755.1230.


USS LST 393 was built by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company at Newport News, Virginia. Miss Lucy Jean Sorensen acted as the sponsor at the launching on November 11th, 1942.

The Landing Ship Tank was commissioned on December 11, 1942 at which time Lt. John H. Halifax, USNR assumed command as the ships's first Commanding Officer. USS LST 393 participated in three invasions in the Atlantic, Mediteranean and made 75 voyages to foreign shores. She carried (9,135) over one-half of the a Division of Army Personnel and 3,248 vehicles ranging from Long Toms to Jeeps. She also carried 5,373 prisioners of war and 817 casualties.

The ship covered some 51,817 nautical miles in her first three years of service and her anchor touched bottom in 38 parts of North Africa, Sicily, Italy, England, Wales, Ireland, France and the Canal Zone.

USS LST 393 won three Battle Stars on the European, African and Middle Eastern Area and was awarded Service Medals for participation in the following operations.

One Star - Sicillian Occupation - September 15, 1943 One Star - Salerno Landings - September 21, 1943 One Star - Invasion of Normandy including the bombardment of Cherburg - June 25, 1944

USS LST 393 was decommissioned at New Orleans, Louisiana on March 1, 1946 and stricken from the Navy list one year later. On March 20, 1948 she was sold to the Sand Products Corp., of Detroit, Michigan for conversion to merchant service. She was renamed the M.V. Highway "16" in lieu of the extension of U.S. Highway "16" from Detroit to Muskegon, Michigan spanning Lake Michigan to Milwaukee where U.S. "16" begins again.

USS LST 393 is the newest fleet member of the Great Lakes Naval Memorial And Museum. Plans are to restore USS LST 393 to her World War II configuration and to obtain National Historic Landmark statist. This vessel will be available to LST Assoications throughout the United States of America for conventions and memorials. The museum will also organize programs to educate present and future generations of the roll of the amphibious force.



USS LST 393 WAR DIARY - June 1944

June 5, 1944
Moored in Falmouth Harbor, Falmouth, England. Received signal from Flag Ship to weigh anchor at 0810. Anchors aweigh at 0823 and underway forming in convoy of Task Group 126. 4 to commence operation plan 1-44 with rhino ferry in tow.

June 7, 1944
Underway in convoy of LSTs and various other ships enroute from Falmouth, England to Colleville, France, carrying army vehicles and army personnel. At 1010 let go bow anchor in 10 fathoms of water off Fox Green Section of Omaha, Beach, Colleville, France. Casualties brought aboard at 1135.

June 8, 1944
Sounded G.Q. at 0115, enemy planes overhead, we held our fire. Anchors aweigh at 1515, underway to proceed in closer to Beach. At 1531 let go stern anchor in 7 fathoms of water in Baie de la Seine off Colleville, France. Men from LST 75 aboard for transportation at 1532. Casualties aboard at 2025. Wanchors aweigh at 2119 to proceed to North Bound convoy anchorage area, at 2217 formed in convoy of LSTs bound for Portland, England.

June 10, 1944
At 1630 English ship alongside to take off casualties and survivors.

June 13, 1944
Underway in convoy of LSTs, enroute Portland, England to Colleville, France. At 1104 anchored off Sugar Red Section, Utah Beach, in 3 fathoms of water.

June 15, 1944
Underway in convoy to Sothampton. Moored bow and starboard side to in Berth 6, in outer dock, Sothampton, England. Casualties taken off at 1137.

June 16, 1944
Underway at 0017 to form in convoy and proceed to Beach inBaie de la Seine, Colleville, France. Anchored at 1352 in 8 fathoms of water. Underway at 1523 to proceed closer to beach. Anchored at 1530 off Omaha, Fow Red Beach, in Colleville, France. Underway at 1738 passing through breakwaer standing out of landing harbor, Omaha Beach, Colleville, France.

June 17, 1944
Beached off Dog White, Omaha Area, Vierville, France. At 0003 sounded G.Q. after receiving red alert. No action secured from G.Q. at 0028. Commenced unloading of vehicles, and army personnel at 0345.Completed at 0400. Received orders from HMS Ceres to proceed to Portland, England, with LCT 210 in tow. Underway at 1200. At 1312 temporary bulkhead on LCT 210 gave way. LCT was ordered to return to beach. Underway again at 1345 to join convoy ten miles ahead.

June 18, 1944
Underway in convoy of the following LSTs 355(F-S), 400, 523, 27, 393, 288, and 532, enroute Portland, South England, to Omaha and Utah Invasion Beaches, Baie de la Seine, France, course 079 degrees, speed 6 knots.Beached at 1231 on "S" Red Section of Utah Beach. 1438 commenced unloading vehicles and personnel on to beach. Commenced taking on casualties and survivors from beach at 1515, completed operation of unloading ship at 1635. Completed taking on casualties and survivors after taking on 302 at 1630.

June 20, 1944
Underway at 0745 to proceed to HMS Ceres for further instructions. Came to anchor off Omaha Beach south east of Kansas Light Ship in Baie de la Seine, France at 0910 underway maneuvering around due to storm at 0937. Underway to proceed to form convoy headed for Sothamption, we acting as commodore of convoy, speed 4, course 025 degrees true.

June 21, 1944
Pilot aboard at 0014. Moored bow and starboard side to Hard "S-3" in Southampton Harbor, Southampton, England. At 0955. Bowsdoors open and commenced unloading of casualties, completed operation of unloading casualties and commenced loading ship with British Army vehicles and personnel. Completed loading operation after taking on 417 men and 12 officers, Bristish personnel, and 68 behicles of various types. Underway at 2109 to proceed to anchorage in Solent. Anchored in St. Helen's Road, Eastern Solent.

June 22, 1944
Underway at 0000 to proceed in convoy of LSTs to Bristish section of invasion Beach, in Baie de la Seine, France. Underway to proceed to anchorage at 2223. Anchored at 2314 off Juno section of British Beach in Courseuelles in Baiede la Seine, France. Sounded G.Q., planes over head, bombs dropped, at 2318 secured from G.Q.

June 23, 1944
Anchored off British section off Courseuelles in Baie de la Seine, France. Sounded G.Q., red alert in area, at 0125; secured from G.Q. at 0230. At 0827 moored starboard side to port side of British Ship, Empire Rhodes, Baie de la Seine, France. Commenced loading with Army personnel and vehicles at 0835. Completed operations after taking aboard 17 trucks from British Empire Rhodes. Underway to British Ship Falstaff at 1224. At 1300 moored starboard side to portside of British Ship Falstaff to unload their army vehicles. In Baie de la Seine, Courseuelles, France. Commenced loading British Personnel and vehicles for English Liberty Ship Falstaff, at 1435. Completed loading operation of vehicles with 13 vehicles aboard, at 1512. Underway to proceed into beach at 1515. Beached on sector Nan-Green on Juno Beach. Began unloading of ship at 1745. Unloading operations completed at 2259. Underway to proceed to anchorage, at 2350. Anchored off British invasion beach in Baie de la Seine, off Courseulles, France.

LST - 394

LST - 394 was laid down on 27 July 1942 at the Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.; launched on 11 November 1942; sponsored by Miss Dorothy Louise Comstock; and commissioned on 15 December 1942. During World War II, LST-394 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Invasion of southern France-August through September 1944 The ship was transferred to the United Kingdom on 24 December 1944. She was decommissioned and returned to United States Navy custody on 12 May 1946. On 19 June 1946, the tank landing ship was struck from the Navy list and sold to N. Block & Co., Norfolk, Va., on 10 December 1947 and subsequently scrapped. LST-394 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 395

LST - 395 was laid down on 28 September 1942 at the Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.; launched on 23 November 1942; sponsored by Miss Audrey Jane Terry; and commissioned on 19 Decemeber 1942, Lt. A. C. Forber, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-395 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Consolidation of southern Solomons-June 1943 New Georgia Group operation: (a) New Georgia-Rendova-Vangunu occupation- July 1943 (b) Vella Lavella occupation-August 1943 Occupation and defense of Cape Torokina-November 1943 Hollandia operation-April 1944 Western New Guinea operations: (a) Biak Island operation-May 1944 (b) Cape Sansapor operation-July and August 1944 Balikpapan operation-June and July 1945 Mindanao Island landings-April 1945 Following the war, LST-395 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-October 1945. Upon her return to the United States, she was decommissioned on 19 April 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 1 May 1946. On 26 September 1947, the ship was sold to the Boston Metals Co., Baltimore, Md., and subsequently scrapped. LST-395 earned six battle stars and the Navy Unit Commendation for World War II service.

LST - 396

LST - 396 was laid down on 28 September 1942 at the Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.; launched on 23 November 1942: sponsored by Miss Ann Hathaway Callis; and commissioned on 23 December 1942, Lt. E. W. White in command. During World War II, LST-396 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Consolidation of southern Solomons-June 1943 New Georgia Group operation: (a) New Georgia-Rendova-Vangunu occupation- July 1943 (b) Vella Lavella occupation-August 1943 LST-396 was sunk by accidental fire and explosion off the Solomon Islands on 18 August 1943. She was struck from the Navy list on 3 September 1943. LST-396 earned one battle star and the Navy Unit Commendation for World War II service.

LST - 397

LST - 397 was laid down on 28 September 1942 at the Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.; launched on 23 November 1942; sponsored by Miss Gretchen Lou White; and commissioned on 28 December 1942. During World War II, LST-397 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Consolidation of southern Solomons-June 1943 New Georgia Group operation: (a) New Georgia-Rendova-Vangunu occupation- July 1943 (b) Vella Lavella occupation-August 1943 Occupation and defense of Cape Torokina-November and December 1943 Hollandia operation-April 1944 Western New Guinea operation: (a) Biak Island operation-June 1944 (b) Noemfoor Island operation-July 1944 (c) Cape Sansapor operation-July and August 1944 (d) Morotai landings-September 1944 Leyte landings-November 1944 Lingayen Gulf landing-January 1945 Mindanao Island landings-March 1945 Following the war, LST-897 performed occupation duty in the Far East in October 1945. Upon her return to the United States, she was decommissioned on 26 April 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 5 June that same year. On 30 September 1947, LST-397 was sold to the Patapsco Scrap Corp., of Baltimore, Md., for scrapping. LST-397 earned seven battle stars and the Navy Unit Commendation for World War II service.

LST - 398

LST - 398 was laid down on 28 September 1942 at the Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.; launched on 23 November 1942; sponsored by Miss Mary Sherwood Giese; and commissioned on 2 January 1943. During World War II, LST-398 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Consolidation of southern Solomons-June 1943 New Georgia Group operations: (a) New Georgia-Rendova-Vangunu occupation- July 1943 (b) Vella Lavella occupation-August 1943 Occupation and defense of Cape Torokina-November and December 1943 Capture and occupation of Guam-August 1944 Following the war, LST-398 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-February 1946. Upon her return to the United States, she was decommissioned on 27 February 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 28 August 1947. On 28 March 1948, LST-398 was sold to Consolidated Builders, Inc., Seattle, Wash. LST-398 earned four battle stars and the Navy Unit Commendation for World War II service.

LST - 399

LST - 399 was laid down on 28 September 1942 at the Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.; launched on 23 November 1942; sponsored by Miss Valerie Macpherson; and commissioned on 4 January 1943. During World War II, LST-399 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: New Georgia Group operation: (a) New Georgia-Rendova-Vangunu occupation- July 1943 (b) Vella Lavella occupation-August 1943 Treasury Island landing-October and November 1943 Capture and occupation of Guam-July 1944 Assault and occupation of Iwo Jima-February 1945 Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto-April 1945 Following the war, LST-399 performed occupation duty in the Far East in the fall of 1945. Upon her return to the United States, she was decommissioned on 8 December 1945. The tank landing ship served with the Military Sealift Command as USNS LST-399 (T-LST-399) from 31 March 1952 until struck from the Navy list on 1 November 1973 and subsequently scrapped. LST-399 earned five battle stars and the Navy Unit Commendation for World War 11 service.

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