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LST - 248 - 295

 

LST-248 through LST - 260

LST - 248 through LST-260 contracts were cancelled on 16 September 1942.

LST - 261

LST - 261 was laid down on 7 September 1942 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 23 January 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Harry F. Snyder; and commissioned on 22 May 1943. During World War 11, LST-261 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. She was decommissioned on 22 February 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 28 March 1946. On 10 November 1947, she was sold to the Biloxi Boat Wrecking Co., of Biloxi, Miss., for scrapping. LST-261 earned one battle star for World War IT service.

LST - 262

LST - 262 was laid down on 7 September 1942 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 13 February 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Oscar Seidel; and commissioned on 15 June 1943. During World War 11, LST-262 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the movement of Convoy UGS-36 in April 1944 and the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. She was decommissioned on 14 January 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 19 June 1946. On 9 December 1947, she was sold to N. Block & Co., of Norfolk, Va., for scrapping. LST-262 earned two battle stars for World War IT service.

LST - 263

LST - 263 was laid down on 7 September 1942 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 27 February 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Charles G. Baumgartner; and commissioned on 30 June 1943. During World War II, LST-263 was assigned to the European theater and participated in Convoy UGS-27 in April 1944 and the invasion of southern France in August and September 1944. She was decommissioned on 29 May 1946 and assigned to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. On 1 July 1955, the ship was redesignated Benton County (LST-263) after nine counties of the United States. She was struck from the Navy list on 1 November 1958. LST-263 earned two battle stars for World War IT service.

LST - 264

LST - 264 was laid down on 21 September 1942 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 13 March 1943; sponsored by Mrs. James Dunn; and commissioned on 16 July 1943, Lt. R. W. Dale, Jr., USNR, in command. During World War IT, LST-264 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. She was decommissioned on 11 January 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 19 June 1946. On 23 April 1948, she was sold to the Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., of Newport News, Va., for conversion to non-self-propelled mercantile operation. LST-264 earned one battle star for World War IT service.

LST - 265

LST - 265 was laid down on 31 October 1942 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 24 April 1943; sponsored by Miss Irene Louise Martin; and commissioned on 27 July 1943, Lt. George F. Sparks, USNR, in command. During World War IT, LST-265 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Convoy UGS-36-April 1944 Elba and Pianosa landings-June 1944 Invasion of southern France-August and September 1944 LST-265 was decommissioned on 11 December 1945 and struck from the Navy list on 3 January 1946. On 20 February 1948, she was sold to Excello Corp., of New Haven, Conn., for conversion to merchant service. LST-265 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 266

LST - 266 was laid down on 11 November 1942 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 16 *May 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Joseph B. Barnwell; and commissioned on 4 August 1943. During World War II, LST-266 was assigned to the European theater and participated in Convoy UGS-26 in April 1944 and the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. She was decommissioned on 25 June 1947 and assigned to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. On 1 July 1955, she was redesignated Benzie County (LST-266) after a county in Michigan. The ship was struck from the Navy list on 1 November 1958. LST-266 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 267

LST - 267 was laid down on 21 November 1942 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 6 June 1943; sponsored by Mrs. D. L. See; and commissioned on 9 August 1943. During World War II, LST-267 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Capture and occupation of Saipan--June and July 1944 Capture and occupation of Tinian-July 1944 Capture and occupation of southern Palau Islands - September and October 1944 Lingayen Gulf landing-January 1945 Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto-March through June 1945 Following the war, LST-267 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until January 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 25 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 31 July that same year. On 24 September 1947, the ship was sold to William E. Skinner for scrapping. LST-267 earned five battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 268

LST - 268 was laid down on 26 November 1942 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 18 June 1943; sponsored by Mrs. W. Ward Powell; and commissioned on 19 August 1943. During World War II, LST-268 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro AtollsFebruary 1944 Tinian capture and occupation-July 1944 Capture and occupation of southern Palau Islands - September and October 1944 Lingayen Gulf landing-January 1945 Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto-March through June 1945 Following the war, LST-268 was redesignated LSTH-268 on 15 September 1945, and she performed occupation duty in the Far East until early February 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 16 February 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 31 October 1947. On 24 March 1948, she was sold to the Consolidated Shipbuilding Corp., of Morris Heights, N.Y., for scrapping. LSTH-268 earned five battle stars for World War II service as LST-268.

LST - 269

LST - 269 was laid down on 28 December 1942 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 4 July 1943; sponsored by Mrs. J. J. Graham; and commissioned on 27 August 1943, Lt. F. C. Helm, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-269 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Hollandia operation-April 1944 Capture and occupation of Saipan-June and July 1944 Leyte landings-October 1944 Nasugbu at Manila Bay-January 1945 Following the war, LST-269 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early February 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 7 February 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 23 December 1947. On 28 May 1948, she was sold to the Bethlehem Steel Co., of Bethlehem, Pa., for scrapping. LST-269 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 270

LST - 270 was laid down on 13 January 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 18 July 1944; sponsored by Mrs. R. D. Seagraves; and commissioned on 8 September 1943, Lt. 0. W. Barber in command. During World War II, LST-270 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro AtollsJanuary and February 1944 Hollandia operation-April 1944 Capture and occupation of Guam-July 1944 Leyte landings-October 1944 LST-270 was sold on 12 May 1950. LST-270 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 271

LST - 271 was laid down on 21 January 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 25 July 1943; sponsored by Mrs. J. F. DeGraaf; and commissioned on 1 September 1943. During World War II, LST-271 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro AtollsJanuary and February 1944 Capture and occupation of Saipan-June and July 1944 Tinian capture and occupation-July 1944 Capture and occupation of southern Palau IslandsSeptember and October 1944 Lingayen Gulf landing-January 1945 LST-271 returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 22 April 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 5 June 1946. On 15 April 1948, she was sold to the Basalt Rock Co., Inc., of Napa, Calif., for scrapping. LST-271 earned five battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 272

LST - 272 was laid down on 9 February 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 1 August 1943; sponsored by Mrs. J. P. D. Gerrese; -and commissioned on 17 September 1943, Lt. Heinrich Heine, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-272 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro AtollsJanuary and February 1944 Occupation of Eniwetok Atoll-February and March 1944 Capture and occupation of Saipan-June and July 1944 Tinian capture and occupation-July 1944 Capture and occupation of southern Palau Islands - September and October 1944 Lingayen Gulf landing-January 1945 She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 16 August 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 25 September 1946. On 5 April 1948, she was sold to the Bethlehem Steel Co., of Bethlehem, Pa., for scrapping. LST-272 earned five battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 273

LST - 273 was laid down on 24 February 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 8 August 1943; sponsored by Mrs. W. H. McComb; and commissioned on 24 September 1943. During World War II, LST-273 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations Marshall Islands operation: (a) Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls- January and February 1944 (b) Occupation of Eniwetok Atoll-February 1944 Capture and occupation of Saipan-June and July 1944 Tinian capture and occupation-July 1944 Capture and occupation of southern Palau Islands - September and October 1944 Lingayen Gulf landing-January 1945 Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto-April 1945 Following the war, LST-273 performed occupation duty in the Far East until late October 1945. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 12 August 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 8 October 1946. On 3 November 1947, she was sold to the Hugo Neu Steel Products Corp., of New York, N.Y. LST-273 earned six battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 274

LST - 274 was laid down on 11 March 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 15 August 1943; sponsored by Mrs. R. F. Salmon; and commissioned on 28 September 1943, Lt. Russell E. Sard, Jr., USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-274 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls in January and February 1944 and the capture and occupation of Saipan in June and July 1944. She was decommissioned on 6 May 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 23 June 1947. On 29 June 1948, she was sold to the Alexander Shipyard, Inc., of New Orleans, La., and converted for merchant service. LST-274 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 275

LST - 275 was laid down on 22 April 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 22 August 1943; sponsored by Mrs. J. N. Walker; and commissioned on 5 October 1943. During World War II, LST-275 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the capture and occupation of Saipan in June and August 1944 and the Tinian capture and occupation in July and August 1944. Following the war, LST-275 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-February 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 16 August 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 25 September 1946. On 5 April 1948, she was sold to the Bethlehem Steel Co., of Bethlehem, Pa., for scrapping. LST-275 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 276

LST - 276 was laid down on 10 May 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 29 August 1943; sponsored by Mrs. J. S. Ragland; and commissioned on 11 October 1943. During World War II, LST-276 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro AtollsFebruary 1944 Hollandia operation-April 1944 Capture and occupation of Guam-July 1944 Capture and occupation of southern Palau IslandsSeptember and October 1944 Lingayen Gulf landing-January 1945 Following the war, LST-276 was redesignated LSTH-276 on 15 September 1945. She performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-February 1946. The tank landing ship returned to the United States and was transferred to the Military Sea Transportation Service on 31 March 1952 for service as LST-276 (T-LST-276) until she was struck from the Navy list on 10 June 1973 and sold. LST-276 earned five battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 277

LST - 277 was laid down on 31 May 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 5 September 1943; sponsored by Mrs. W. D. Guernsey; and commissioned on 24 October 1943. During World War II, LST-277 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro AtollsFebruary 1944 Capture and occupation of Saipan-June 1944 Leyte landings-October 1944 Nasugbu at Manila Bay operation-January 1945 Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto-March through June 1945 Following the war, LST-277 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early February 1946 when she returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 12 February 1946. She served with the Shipping Control Authority, Japan, from 20 May 1949 until 31 March 1952. She was transferred on that date to the Military Sea Transportation Service where she served until struck from the Navy list on 1 February 1973. On 2 February 1973, she was sold to the Chilean Navy which she served as Commandante Toro (LST- 97). LST-277 earned five battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 278

LST - 278 was laid down on 16 June 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 12 September 1943; sponsored by Mrs. R. F. Dickinson; and commissioned on 22 October 1943. During World War 11, LST-278 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Marianas operation: (a) Capture and occupation of Saipan-June and July 1944 (b) Tinian capture and occupation-July 1944 Capture and occupation of southern Palau IslandsSeptember and October 1944 LST-278 was decommissioned on 22 January 1945 and redesignated Seaward (IX-209) (q.v.) and recommissioned on 14 February 1945. She served as a barracks and post office at Ulithi until declared in excess of the Navy's needs and destroyed on 16 October 1946. She was struck from the Navy list on 22 May 1947. LST-278 earned three battle stars for World War 11 service.

LST - 279

LST - 279 was laid down on 2 July 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 19 September 1943; sponsored by Miss Marion Ruth Warsack; and commissioned on 25 October 1943, Lt. Charles A. Palm, USNR, in command. During World War 11, LST-279 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 14 June 1955. On 1 July 1955, she was named Berkeley County (LST-279) after counties in South Carolina and West Virginia. The tank landing ship was transferred to Nationalist China on 30 June 1955 as Chung Chie (LST-218) and struck from the Navy list on 25 April 1960. LST-279 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST - 280

LST - 280 was laid down on 16 July 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 26 September 1943; sponsored by Miss Lois Johnston; and commissioned on 2 November 1943. During World War II, LST-280 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. On 26 October 1944, she was transferred to the United Kingdom and returned to United States Navy custody on 11 April 1946. She was decommissioned on 13 April 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 5 June 1946. LST-280 was sold to Bosey, Philippines, on 5 December 1947. LST-280 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST - 281

LST - 281 was laid down on 25 June 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 30 September 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Mary Richards; and commissioned on 8 November 1943. During World War II, LST-281 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of Normandy in June 1944, and the invasion of southern France in August and September 1944. She was then assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in June 1945. Following the war, LST-281 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early February 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 9 March 1946 and transferred to the Shipping Control Authority, Japan, on 20 May 1949. She served with the Military Sea Transportation Service as USNS T-LST-281 from 31 March 1952 until struck from the Navy list on 19 May 1954 and sold. LST-281 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 282

LST - 282 was laid down on 12 July 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 3 October 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Carl B. Ihli; and commissioned on 12 November 1943. During World War 11, LST-282 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of Normandy in June 1944 and the invasion of southern France in August 1944. On 15 August 1944, LST-282 was sunk by a German radio-controlled bomb off southern France and struck from the Navy list on 16 September 1944. LST-282 earned two battle stars for World War 11 service.

LST - 283

LST - 283 was laid down on 2 August 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 10 October 1943; sponsored by Mrs. C. W. McNamee; arid commissioned on 18 November 1943. During World War II, LST-283 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of Normandy in June 1944 and the invasion of southern France in August and September 1944. She performed occupation duty in the Far East between September and November 1945. Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 13 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 22 January 1947. On 25 March 1947, she was sold to Northrup H. Castle, of Honolulu, Hawaii, for conversion to merchant service. She was purchased by Peru on 21 December 1951 for service in the Peruvian Navy as Chimbote (LST-34). LST-283 earned two battle stars for World War H service. ╩╩LST 283 was sold to Mr. Caesar Roose of Mercer, New Zealand, in about Oct. 1947. She loaded over 200 trucks and other equipment at Pearl Harbour H.I. and sailed for New Zealand , arriving there in early 1948 (feb). She entered Port Waikato, the mouth of the Waikato River on the West coast, North Island. The trucks and machinery was unloaded on to barges and towed up river to Hamilton. (Central North Island ) She lay there for about a year before sailing to SUVA Fiji Islands, which became her port of registry. She plied the South Pacific Islands recovering war surplus machinery , scrap metal and ╩generally returned this to Sydney, Australia. A lot came from Hollandia, Dutch New Guinea and also from Tulahgi, Solomon Islands. She carried cattle from New Zealand to Solomon Islands, ╩Fruit from Fiji/ New Zealand and Australia Hardwood timber Australia/New Zealand. Her trading name was "RAWHITI" maori meaning "morning Light" or sunrise. She was loaded with 3, 000 tons of scrap metal in New Zealand ang sailed for San Francisco in early 1951 where after discharge and drydocking ╩she was handed over to the Navy of PERU. After a long service with that country she was anchored at San Lorenzo Island and allowed to sink. She went down in about 1989. Her general duties included several voyages carrying road building material and cement all the way from LIMA, PERU thru the Panama Canal and up the Amazon River to the fluvial port of IQUITOS. ╩╩ ╩╩╩╩╩Regards ╩╩Ray Morey. ╩Australia.

LST - 284

LST - 284 was laid down on 9 August 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 17 October 1943; sponsored by Mrs. R. R. Goll; and commissioned on 25 November 1943, Ensign W. H. Pennington in command. During World War II, LST-284 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of Normandy in June 1944 and the invasion of southern France in August and September 1944. She was then assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in May and June 1945. She performed occupation duty in the Far East until early November 1945. Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 13 March 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 19 June 1946. On 11 December 1947, she was sold to the Southern Shipwrecking Co,, of New Orleans, La., for scrapping. LST-284 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 285

LST - 285 was laid down on 16 August 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 24 October 1943; sponsored by Mrs. R. A. Shaw; and commissioned on 13 December 1943. During World War II, LST-285 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of Normandy in June 1944 and the invasion of southern France in August and September 1944. Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 27 June 1947 and struck from the Navy list on 1 August 1947. On 26 March 1948, she was sold to the Kaiser Co., Inc., of Seattle, Wash., for scrapping. LST-285 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 286

LST - 286 was laid down on 23 August 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 27 October 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Lois Ethel Leseman; and commissioned on 11 December 1943. During World War II, LST-286 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of Normandy in June 1944 and the invasion of southern France in August and September 1944. She performed occupation duty in the Far East in September, November, and December 1945. Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 26 March 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 8 May 1946. On 15 April 1948, she was sold to the Bethlehem Steel Co., of Bethlehem, Pa., for scrapping. LST-286 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 287

LST - 287 was laid down on 30 August 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 31 October 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Agnes Johnston; and commissioned on 15 December 1943, Lt. Frank P. Eldredge, USNR, in command. During World War If, LST-287 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. LST-287 was transferred to the Military Sea Transportation Service on 29 May 1951 where she operated as USNS LST-287. USNS LST-287 was later transferred to the Philippine Navy on 13 September 1976. LST-287 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST - 288

LST - 288 was laid down on 6 September 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 7 November 1943; sponsored by Miss Virginia M. Plofchan; and commissioned on 20 December 1943. During World War II, LST-288 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of Normandy in June 1944 and the invasion of southern France in August and September 1944. She was then assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in May and June 1945. She performed occupation duty in the Far East in late 1945 and early 1946. Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 6 March 1946. She served with the Shipping Control Authority, Japan, from 20 May 1949 to 14 June 1950. On 1 July 1955, the tank landing ship was redesignated Berkshire County (LST-288) after a county in Massachusetts. She was transferred to Korea, on loan, on 5 March 1956 where she served as Ke Bong (LST-810). LST-288 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 289

LST - 289 was laid down on 14 September 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 21 November 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Raymond Clapper; and commissioned on 31 December 1943, Lt. Harry A. Mettler, USNR, in command. LST-289 was transferred to the United Kingdom on 9 December 1944 and returned to United States Navy custody on 12 October 1946. She was struck from the Navy list on 15 October 1946 and sold to the Netherlands as Fendracht on 30 January 1947 where she was converted for merchant service in 1956.

LST - 290

LST - 290 was laid down on 22 September 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 5 December 1943; sponsored by Mrs. C. S. Garner; and commissioned on 10 January 1944. During World War II, LST-290 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 15 November 1945 and struck from the Navy list on 28 November 1945. On 23 December 1946, she was sold to Conlon and Tendler for conversion to merchant service. LST-290 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST - 291

LST - 291 was laid down on 25 September 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 14 November 1943; sponsored by Mrs. John A. Parfitt; and commissioned on 22 December 1943, Ensign A. G. McNair in command. During World War II, LST-291 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 18 June 1947 and struck from the Navy list on 19 May 1954. She was sunk as a target in July 1954. LST-291 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST - 292

LST - 292 was laid down on 30 September 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 28 November 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Stuart Brown, Jr.; and commissioned on 5 January 1944. During World War II, LST-292 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 25 January 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 12 April 1946. On 21 January 1948, she was sold to Hughes Bros., New York, N.Y., for scrapping. LST-292 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST - 293

LST - 293 was laid down on 5 October 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 12 December 1943; sponsored by Mrs. R. E. Mason; and commissioned on 17 January 1944. During World War II, LST-293 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 3 December 1945 and struck from the Navy list on 19 December 1945. On 1 June 1949, she was sold to James Hughes, Inc., New York, N.Y., for scrapping. LST-293 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST - 294

LST - 294 was laid down on 12 October 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 15 December 1943; sponsored by Mrs. J. S. Sohn; and commissioned on 20 January 1944, Ensign Edward J. Cantelope, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-294 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 18 December 1945 and struck from the Navy list on 8 January 1946. On 13 October 1947, she was sold to Luria Bros. & Co., of Philadelphia, Pa. LST-294 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST - 295

LST - 295 was laid down on 19 October 1943 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co.; launched on 24 December 1943; sponsored by Miss Virginia Helen Valenta; and commissioned on 7 February 1944. During World War II, LST-295 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. Upon returning to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 28 December 1945 and struck from the Navy list on 12 April 1946. On 12 September 1947, she was sold to C. W. Edwards for conversion to merchant service. LST-295 earned one battle star for World War II service.

 

 

 

 

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