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LST - 176 - 209

LST-176

LST-176 was laid down on 18 January 1943 at Evansville, Ind., by the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co.; launched on 15 April 1943; sponsored by Mrs. L. J. Prues; and commissioned on 12 May 1943, Lt. J. S. Salt, USCGR, in command.

During World War II, LST-176 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. Following the war, LST-176 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early January 1946. She was decommissioned on 6 January 1946 and transferred to the Shipping Control Authority, Japan, and operated with a Japanese civilian crew. On 31 March 1952, she was redelivered to the United States Navy and served with the Military Sea Transportation Service as USNS T- LST-176 until she was stricken from the Navy list on 1 November 1973.

LST-176 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-177

LST-177 was laid down on 5 February 1943 at Evansville, Ind., by the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co.; launched on 16 May 1943; sponsored by Mrs. James Gibson; and commissioned on 22 June 1943.

During World War II, LST-177 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the movement of UGS- 36 in April 1944 and the invasion of southern France in August and September 1944. On 11 February 1946, the ship was decommissioned and was struck from the Navy list on 12 April 1946. On 13 March 1947 she was transferred to France as a sale. She served in the French Navy as Laita (L- 9001) until she was decommissioned in January 1962 and converted to a port depot ship.

LST-177 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST-178

LST-178 was laid down on 6 February 1943 at Evansville, Ind., by the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co.; launched on 23 May 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Charles Haglin; and commissioned on 21 June 1943.

During World War 11, LST-178 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the movement of Convoy UGS-36 in April 1944 and the invasion of southern France in August and September 1944. LST-178 was decommissioned and transferred to the United Kingdom on 24 December 1944 and was returned to United States Navy custody on 12 December 1946. In November 1946, she was sold to the Egyptian Navy and was struck from the Navy list on 22 January 1947.

LST-178 earned two battle stars for World War 11 service.

LST-1 79

LST-179 was laid down on 7 February 1943 at Evansville, Ind., by the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co.; launched on 30 May 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Milford M. Miller; and commissioned on 3 July 1943.

During World War II, LST-179 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the Gilbert Islands operation during November and early December 1943. The ship was gutted by fire and sunk at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on 21 May 1944 and was struck from the Navy list on 18 July 1944. In November 1945, she was subsequently raised, stripped, and sunk by torpedo fire in an ordnance test.

LST-179 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-180

LST-180 was laid down in 8 February 1943 at Evansville, Ind., by the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co.; launched on 3 June 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Samuel M. Galls; and commissioned on 29 June 1943.

On 10 July 1943, LST-180 was decommissioned and transferred to the United Kingdom. She was returned to United States Navy custody on 17 December 1945 and was struck from the Navy list on 21 January 1946. LST-180 was sold to the Ships & Power Equipment Co., of Barber, N.J., on 10 March 1948, and was converted for merchant service.

LST-181

LST-181 was laid down on 7 April 1943 at Jeffersonville, Ind., by the Jeffersonville Boat & Machine Co.; launched on 3 July 1943; sponsored by Mrs. T. J. Eifler; and commissioned on 21 August 1943.

During World War II, LST-181 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Bismarck Archipelago operation:

(a) Cape Gloucester, New Britain-February 1944

(b) Admiralty Islands landings-March 1944 Hollandia operation-April and May 1944

Western New Guinea operation:

(a) Toem-Wakde-Sarmi area operation-May 1944

(b) Biak Island operation-June 1944

(c) Noemfoor Island operation-July 1944

(d) Cape Sansapor operation-July and August 1944

(e) Morotai landings-September 1944 Leyte landings-October and November 1944 Visayan Islands landings-March and April 1945 Borneo operations:

(a) Balikpapan operation-June and July 1945

LST-181 was decommissioned on 4 March 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 12 April 1946. On 9 December 1946, she was sold to the Construction Power Machinery Co., of Brooklyn, N.Y.

LST-181 earned seven battle stars for World War II service.

LST-182 through LST-196

LST-182 through LST-196 contracts were cancelled on 16 September 1942.

LST-197

LST-197 was laid down on 15 June 1942 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co.; launched on 13 December 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Harriet Williamson; and commissioned on 5 February 1943, Lt. T. S. Medford, USNR, in command.

During World War II, LST-197 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations:

Sicilian occupation-July 1943

Salerno landings-September 1943 West coast of Italy operations:

(a) Anzio-Nettuno advanced landings-January through March 1944

Invasion of Normandy-June 1944

Following the war, LST-197 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early November 1945. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 5 April 1946. She was struck from the Navy list on 5 June 1946 and sold to the Luria Steel & Trading Co., of New York, N.Y., on 31 October 1947 for scrapping.

LST-197 earned four battle stars and the Navy Unit Commendation for World War II service.

LST-198

LST-198 was laid down on 22 June 1942 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co.; launched on 17 January 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Martha Sherman; and commissioned on 15 February 1943.

On 27 February 1943, LST-198 was decommissioned and transferred to the United Kingdom on 6 March 1943. The ship was returned to United States custody on 23 January 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 20 March 1946. On 19 March 1948, she was sold to the Ships & Power Equipment Corp., of Barber, N.J., for scrapping.

LST-199

LST-199 was laid down on 27 June 1942 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co.; launched on 7 February 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Mary Bell; and commissioned on 1 March 1943. LST-199 saw no service with the United States Navy. On 19 March 1943, %he was decommissioned and transferred to the United Kingdom. On 27 March 1946, she was lost while on lease and was struck from the Navy list on 17 April 1946.

LST-200

LST-200 was laid down on 2 July 1942 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co.; launched on 20

February 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Mary Armstrong; and commissioned on 16 March 1943.

LST-200 saw no service with the United States Navy. On 25 March 1943, she was transferred to the United Kingdom and was returned to United States Navy custody on 27 February 1946. She was struck from the Navy list on 17 April 1946 and was sold to the Ships & Power Equipment Corp., of Barber, N.J., on 26 March 1948. She was later resold and converted for merchant service.

LST- 201

LST-201 was laid down on 13 July 1942 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co.; launched on 2 March 1943; sponsored by Miss Loraine Johnson; and commissioned on 2 April 1943, Lt. Samuel D. LaRoue in command.

During World War II, LST-201 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Eastern New Guinea operations-November 1943 through April 1944

Hollandia operation-April 1944

Western New Guinea operations-May through August 1944

She was redesignated AGP-20 and named Pontus (q.v.) after a Greek god of the sea on -15 August 1944. She participated in the Leyte landing in November 1944 and, following the war, performed occupation duty in the Far East in November 1945. Decommissioned on 2 April 1946, Pontus was struck from the Navy list on 1 May 1946. She ship was transferred to the Maritime Commission on 26 November 1947 for disposal.

Pontus received one battle star for World War II service under her name and three more for World War II service as LST-201.

LST-202

LST-202 was laid down on 15 July 1942 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co.; launched on 16 March 1943; sponsored by Mrs. P. 1. Birchard; and commissioned on 9 April 1943.

During World War 11, LST-202 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Bismarck-Archipelago operations:

(a) Cape Gloucester, New Britain-December 1943, January and February 1944

(b) Admiralty Islands landings-February and March 1944

Eastern New Guinea operation:

(a) Saidor operations-January and February 1944

Hollandia operations-April and May 1944

Western New Guinea operations:

(a) Toem-Wakde-Sarmi operation-May 1944

(b) Noemfoor Island operation-July 1944

(c) Cape Sansapor operation-July and August 1944

(d) Morotai landings-September 1944

Leyte landings-October and November 1944

Following the war, LST-202 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early November 1945. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 11 April 1946. She was struck from the Navy list on 28 August 1946 and was sold to the Bethlehem Steel Co., of Seattle, Wash., on 16 April 1948 for scrapping.

LST-202 earned five battle stars for World War II service.

LST-203

LST-203 was laid down on 2 July 1942 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co.; launched on

25 March 1943; sponsored by Miss Fay Horton; and commissioned on 22 April 1943. The ship ran aground on 1 October 1943 near Nanumea in the Ellice Islands and was declared a total loss. LST-203 was struck from the Navy list on 6 March 1944.

LST-204

LST-204 was laid down on 24 July 1942 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co.; launched on 3 April 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Florence S. Jacobs; and commissioned on 27 April 1943.

During World War II, LST-204 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Eastern New Guinea operation:

(a) Finschhafen occupation-September 1943

(b) Saidor occupation-January and February 1944

Bismarck Archipelago operation:

(a) -Cape Gloucester, New Britain-December 1943, January, February and March 1944

Hollandia operation-April and May 1944 Western New Guinea operations:

(a) Biak Island operation-June 1944

(b) Noemfoor Island operation-July 1944

(c) Cape Sansapor operation-July and August 1944

(d) Morotai landings-September 1944

Leyte landings-October and November 1944 Lingayen Gulf landing-January 1945 Mindanao Island landings-March and April 1945

LST-204 was decommissioned on 23 February 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 5 June 1946. On 8 October 1947, she was sold to the New Orleans Shipwrecking Corp., of Chicago, Ill., for scrapping.

LST-204 earned seven battle stars for World War 11 service.

LST-205

LST-205 was laid down on 5 August 1942 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co.; launched on 13 April 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Doris DeHaven; and commissioned on 15 May 1943.

During World War II, LST-205 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Gilbert Islands operation-November and December 1943

Biak Island operation-June 1944

Capture and occupation of Saipan-June and July 1944

Leyte landings-October and November 1944

Following the war, LST-205 was redesignated LSTH-205 on 15 September 1945. She performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-December 1945.

Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 2 April 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 5 June 1946. On 4 June 1948, she was sold to Hughes Bros., Inc., of New York City, N.Y., for scrapping.

LSTH-205 earned four battle stars for World War II service as LST-205.

LST-206

LST-206 was laid down on 7 August 1942 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co.; launched on 21 April 1943; sponsored by Mrs. William Connor Laird; and commissioned on 7 June 1943.

During World War II, LST-206 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Bismarck Archipelago operation:

(a) Cape Gloucester, New Britain-December 1943, January, February and March 1944

(b) Admiralty Islands landings-March 1944

Hollandia operation-April and May 1944

Saidor occupation-January and February 1944

Western New Guinea operations:

(a) Toem-Wakde-Sarmi area operation-May 1944

(b) Biak Island operation-June 1944

(c) Cape Sansapor operation-July and August 1944

(d) Morotai Iandings-September 1944

Leyte landings-October and November 1944

Balikpapan operation-July 1945

LST-206 was decommissioned on 6 May 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 5 June 1946. On 7 April 1948, she was sold to the Bethlehem Steel Co., of Seattle, Wash., for scrapping.

LST-206 earned six battle stars for World War II service.

LST-207

LST-207 was laid down on 7 September 1942 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co.; launched on 29 April 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Florence Horton Gillatt; and commissioned on 9 June 1943.

During World War 11, LST-207 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Occupation and defense of Cape Torokina-Novemher 1943

Green Islands landing-February 1944

Capture and occupation of Guam-July 1944

Leyte landing-October 1944

Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto-May 1945

Following the war, LST-207 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-November 1945. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 20 March 1946. She was struck from the Navy list on 17 April 1946. On 19 December 1947, she was sold to the Ships & Power Equipment Corp., of Barber, N.J., for scrapping.

LST-207 earned five battle stars for World War II service.

LST-208

LST-208 was laid down on 7 September 1942 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co.; launched on 11 May 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Bernice Neurohr; and commissioned on 8 June 1943, Lt. Robert W. Emmons, USNR, in command.

During World War II, LST-208 was assigned to the European theater and took part in the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. Following the war, LST-208 performed occupation duty in the Far East until midMay 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 12 June 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 3 July 1946. On 5 December 1947, she was sold to Bosey, Philippines.

LST-208 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-209

LST-209 was laid down on 7 September 1942 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co.; launched on 29 May 1943; sponsored by Mrs. C. A. Dalton; and commissioned on 10 June 1943.

During World War II, LST-209 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. She returned to the United

States and was placed out of commission, in reserve, on 27 June 1946, and was transferred to the Military Sea Transportation Service for service as USNS LST-209. On 1 July 1955, she was named Bamberg County (LST-209) after a county in South Carolina. She was struck from the Navy list on 1 November 1958 and sold to Tolchester Lines, Inc., Arlington, Va., and resold to Dravo Corp., Pittsburgh, Pa., on 23 February 1961.

Bamberg County (LST-209) earned one battle star for World War II service as LST-209.

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